an academic

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  • Planned and focused: answers the question and demonstrates an understanding of the subject.
  • Structured: is coherent, written in a logical order, and brings together related points and material.
  • Evidenced: demonstrates knowledge of the subject area, supports opinions and arguments with evidence, and is referenced accurately.
  • Formal in tone and style: uses appropriate language and tenses, and is clear, concise and balanced.

Each subject discipline will have certain writing conventions, vocabulary and types of discourse that you will become familiar with over the course of your degree. However, there are some general characteristics of academic writing that are relevant across all disciplines.

Last Updated: May 21, 2020 References Approved
This article was co-authored by Christopher Taylor, PhD. Christopher Taylor is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Austin Community College in Texas. He received his PhD in English Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014.

Each subject discipline will have certain writing conventions, vocabulary and types of discourse that you will become familiar with over the course of your degree. However, there are some general characteristics of academic writing that are relevant across all disciplines.
Academic writing is:

An academic
How to write an academic introduction

An introduction is the most important section of an essay. It informs the reader of the context and what is your stance on the subject. It is usually written after the main body and should include a number of key parts. This webpage discusses the common structure and focuses on the importance of the thesis (stance).

An academic argument is your stance, your claim, or your take on your topic.
This stance, claim, or take is your contribution to the current conversation on your topic and provides your readers with a position, perspective, and/or point of view on your topic.

Much of academic English is about expressing the relationship between ideas. Although the language may be more complex than in everyday English, good academic writers aim to be as clear, precise and simple as possible. They think about what their readers know already, and aim to guide them towards less familiar areas and topics.
The ability to write in an academic style is something you develop as part of your university study. It is difficult to give overall ‘rules’ on the way to write for a university course, as academic subjects vary in

An academic essay aims to persuade readers of an idea based on evidence.

  • An academic essay should answer a question or task.
  • It should have a thesis statement (answer to the question) and an argument.
  • It should try to present or discuss something: develop a thesis via a set of closely related points by reasoning and evidence.
  • An academic essay should include relevant examples, supporting evidence and information from academic texts or credible sources.

References:

http://library.leeds.ac.uk/info/14011/writing/106/academic_writing
http://www.wikihow.com/Become-an-Academic
http://library.leeds.ac.uk/info/14011/writing/106/academic_writing
http://www.academic-englishuk.com/write-academic-introduction
http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/writingprocess/arguments
http://help.open.ac.uk/what-is-academic-english
http://student.unsw.edu.au/essay-writing-basics
http://articlereword.com/rewriter/